Feeds:
Posts
Comments

By Francis X. Rocca Catholic News Service

Pope Benedict XV, who served as pope from 1914-1922, is pictured in this image from L'Osservatore Romano's Fondo Giordani collection. He was elected pope less than six weeks after the outbreak of World War I -- and almost immediately started campaigning against it. (CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano)

Pope Benedict XV, who served as pope from 1914-1922, is pictured in this image from L’Osservatore Romano’s Fondo Giordani collection. He was elected pope less than six weeks after the outbreak of World War I — and almost immediately started campaigning against it. (CNS photo/L’Osservatore Romano)

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Among the various World War I-related anniversaries of this centennial year, the election of Pope Benedict XV, 100 years ago Sept. 3, is apt to be one of the less widely observed.

Pope Benedict XV is the most obscure of the nine men who have led the Catholic Church over the last century — the title of his biography by historian John F. Pollard is “The Unknown Pope” — and in some ways, this negative distinction seems justified. His seven-and-a-half-year pontificate was relatively short and, with respect to his most prominent undertaking, spectacularly unsuccessful.

Yet Pope Benedict left a legacy of lasting significance for the papacy and the church as a whole in the vital area of teaching and practice on war and peace.

Cardinal Giacomo della Chiesa of Bologna, Italy, was elected pope less than six weeks after the outbreak of the world war — and almost immediately started campaigning against it. His efforts reached their peak in his Peace Note of 1917, which urged all belligerents to stop fighting in favor of international arbitration of their disputes.

All of these efforts were for naught, largely because of the weakness of Vatican diplomacy, which had languished since the Holy See lost the Papal States half a century earlier.

“The Vatican by 1914 had relations with only two great powers; one was Austria-Hungary, the other was the Russian empire, and with the Russian empire, relations were pretty bad,” Pollard said.

U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, who took his nation into the war in 1917, was dismissive of Pope Benedict’s attempts to intervene. Even many Catholic bishops on both sides put patriotism ahead of loyalty to the pope and openly undercut his calls for peace. Continue Reading »

The parishioners at St. Pius X, Beaumont, celebrated the 60th anniversary of the parish at Mass on Oct 24 with Bishop Curtis Guillory, SVD, and the installation of their new pastor, Father Gus Wall, SVD.

Bishop Guillory said that St. Pius is a true example of the diversity in the community and that the faith that was established 2,000 years ago is continued with the parishioners of St. Pius. Continue Reading »

To celebrate the 50 anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Subcommittee on African American Affairs will release a series of resources to highlight the achievements of the Civil Rights era and its connections to the Catholic Church

“The Civil Rights era was an important time in the history of our country. In constructive ways, many priests, religious sisters, religious brothers and lay Catholic faithful were involved in the struggle for Civil Rights,” said Bishop Shelton Fabre of Houma-Thibodaux, Louisiana, chairman of the Subcommittee. Continue Reading »

WASHINGTON–Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that it is issuing an additional set of interim final rules to implement its requirement that health plans, including employer-sponsored plans, provide for sterilization, contraception, and drugs that can cause an abortion. In response, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), provided the following statement: Continue Reading »

By Francis X. Rocca Catholic News Service

A man walks past a sign outside a shop Aug. 20 put up in memory of James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H. Foley, a freelance war correspondent and a Marquette University alum, was killed at the hands of the Islamic State militant group. (CNS phot o/Brian Snyder, Reuters)

A man walks past a sign outside a shop Aug. 20 put up in memory of James Foley in his hometown of Rochester, N.H. Foley, a freelance war correspondent and a Marquette University alum, was killed at the hands of the Islamic State militant group. (CNS phot o/Brian Snyder, Reuters)

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Francis phoned the bereaved family of a U.S. journalist killed by Islamic State militants in Syria.

Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, said the pope phoned relatives of the late James Foley on Aug. 21 to console them for their loss and assure them of his prayers.

Passionist Father Ciro Benedettini, assistant director of the Vatican press office, told reporters the next day that the pope’s call came shortly after 2 p.m. New Hampshire time, and that the conversation was “long and intense.”

Pope Francis was particularly “struck by the faith” of the late journalist’s mother, Diane Foley, the spokesman said. The pope spoke with her and the deceased’s father, John Foley, through an interpreter. At one point, an unidentified family member came on the line and was able to converse with the pope directly in Spanish. Continue Reading »

By Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

Pope Francis embraces woman during weekly audience at VaticanVATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Francis, in mourning for the deaths of his nephew’s wife and two small children, thanked people at his weekly general audience Aug. 20 for their prayers.

After each of the priests who translate the pope’s words offered him condolences for the tragedy that struck his family, Pope Francis explained to the people: “The pope has a family, too. We were five siblings, and I have 16 nieces and nephews. One of these nephews was in an accident. His wife died along with his two small children — one who was 2 years old and the other several months.” Continue Reading »

St. Anthony (1)Hundreds turned out for A Tasting for Some Other Place Aug. 19 at the Beaumont Civic Center. Several parishes participated offering various dishes from strawberry shortcake to red beans and rice. The tasting raises money for Some Other Place to continue to help those in the Beaumont community who are in need of food by offering a soup kitchen and a pantry. Continue Reading »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 49 other followers